January 2017
Updated: 22/01/2017

Professor Margaret Hellard

Updated policy brief: People who inject drugs can be successfully treated for hepatitis C, and treatment has the potential to reduce the community prevalence of hepatitis C Policy Brief 3

Professor Hellard describes the individual and community benefits of treatment of hepatitis C in people who inject drugs, and calls upon policy makers to ensure that health services are located and structured so that people who inject drugs can access hepatitis C treatment and can be appropriately supported whilst on therapy.


December 2015
Updated: 09/12/2015

Professor Paul Dietze
Professor Margaret Hellard
Associate Professor Stuart Kinner
Doctor Mark Stoové

CREIDU Submission to UNGASS 2016 Policy Submission

CREIDU has written a submission to United Nations General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem.


May 2015
Updated: 26/05/2015

Elise Carrotte
Professor Paul Dietze
Amy Kirwan

Syringe coverage and Australian NSPs Policy Brief 9

This policy brief explores current estimates of syringe coverage in Australia and provides suggestions for improving coverage rates.


May 2015
Updated: 12/05/2015

Professor Paul Dietze
Amy Kirwan

Submission to the TGA consultation on naloxone rescheduling Policy Submission

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) is seeking submissions in relation to amending “the scheduling of naloxone to include single use prefilled syringe preparations for injection containing 400 micrograms/mL of naloxone or less in Schedule 3”. Our submission supports amending the scheduling of naloxone from Schedule 4 to Schedule 3.


September 2014
Updated: 24/02/2015

Jenny Kelsall
Trevor King
Amy Kirwan
Sarah Lord

Opioid pharmacotherapy fees: A long-standing barrier to treatment entry and retention Policy Brief 8

This brief explores the issue of opioid pharmacotherapy dispensing fees and offers suggestions for resolving this complex issue


December 2012
Updated: 11/01/2013

Doctor Mark Stoové

Confronting reality: opportunities to address injecting drug use in correctional settings Policy Brief 7

Explores the evidence for prison-based programs to reduce injecting drug use and related harm, including post-release overdose.


December 2012
Updated: 24/02/2015

Associate Professor Stuart Kinner

High-risk injecting drug use after release from prison Policy Brief 6

Explores the risks associated with a return to injecting drug use following release from prison, and highlights prison-based preventative strategies, transitional interventions and the need for more research into health outcomes following release from prison.


September 2012
Updated: 24/02/2015

Trevor King

Proposed Victorian Alcohol and Drug Treatment Principles Policy Submission

A response from the Centre for Research Excellence into Injecting Drug Use (CREIDU) to the proposed Victorian Alcohol and Drug Treatment Principles.


September 2012
Updated: 24/02/2015

Professor Lisa Maher

Increasing hepatitis B vaccination in people who inject drugs Policy Brief 5

Injecting drug use is a leading risk factor for hepatitis B, however despite this and the availability of a free hepatitis B vaccine, uptake and completion of the full course of hepatitis B vaccination by people who inject drugs (PWID) is low. Professor Maher recommends changes to current policy and practice to promote access to and increase uptake of hepatitis B vaccination for PWID.


June 2012
Updated: 24/02/2015

Professor Paul Dietze
Professor Simon Lenton

Improving responses to opioid overdose through naloxone Policy Brief 4

Heroin and other opioid overdose is a major cause of death and disability among people who inject drugs. Around one Australian dies from such overdoses every day and there are many more non-fatal overdoses. Naloxone is a cheap, safe and effective overdose-reversal drug. This policy brief advocates for the removal of legislative and practical barriers to the wider distribution of naloxone in Australia.


November 2011
Updated: 24/02/2015

Professor Robert Power

Safe injecting facilities: reducing harm and improving public safety and amenity Policy Brief 2

The link between injecting with unsterile equipment and the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other blood-borne viruses is well established. Safe injecting facilities (SIFs) provide safer, supervised locations for individuals to inject drugs. This policy brief explores the evidence supporting SIFs, including the positive impact on the individual and on public health and public amenity.